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Laser Gum Treatment

The LANAP® Procedure is an amazing breakthrough in periodontal treatments. If you have been told you need scalpel and suture gum surgery, there's a laser alternative you need to learn about.

If you're like 100 million other Americans, you could be one of 50% of Americans who have periodontal disease, the major cause of tooth loss in adults. Periodontal disease starts off as plaque, an opaque film which eventually hardens, forming tartar or calculus.
  
Calculus deposits harbor bacteria which infect the gums. In early stages, this is called Gingivitis, characterized by red, swollen gums that bleed when you brush your teeth. Many people experience bad breath and an unpleasant taste in their mouths as well. Unchecked, Gingivitis progresses to Periodontitis, a much more serious form of the disease where periodontal pockets are formed, separating teeth from the gums and supporting bone structure. Without treatment, infection becomes severe and the pockets deepen, resulting in tooth loss.

The way to repair the damage is to get rid of the infection and close up the pockets. Until now, that meant surgery and sutures. But today, many dentists offer the LANAP® Protocol, a patient-friendly, minimally-invasive procedure that's a great improvement over standard gum surgery.

In most cases, your dentist will schedule a complimentary consultation to explain how the laser works and give you a demonstration. Next, the dentist will take X-rays to make a definitive diagnoses and determine the extent of the infection. When you return for your first LANAP® Procedure treatment, you'll receive a local anaesthetic to eliminate any possible discomfort. A general anaesthetic isn't necessary, because the LANAP® Procedure is much less traumatic. A tiny laser fiber (about the thickness of three hairs) is inserted between the tooth and the gum, and the infection is cleared away. The procedure is fast: It takes just two 2-hour sessions. Your dentist will treat one half of your mouth at each session...and you'll probably feel good enough to go right back to work afterwards.


Digital X- Rays

Digital radiography (digital x-ray) is the latest technology used to take dental x-rays.  This technique uses an electronic sensor (instead of x-ray film) that captures and stores the digital image on a computer.  This image can be instantly viewed and enlarged helping the dentist and dental hygienist detect problems easier.  Digital x-rays reduce radiation 80-90% compared to the already low exposure of traditional dental x-rays.

Dental x-rays are essential, preventative, diagnostic tools that provide valuable information not visible during a regular dental exam.  Dentists and dental hygienists use this information to safely and accurately detect hidden dental abnormalities and complete an accurate treatment plan.  Without x-rays, problem areas may go undetected.

Dental x-rays may reveal:

  • Abscesses or cysts.
  • Bone loss.
  • Cancerous and non-cancerous tumors.
  • Decay between the teeth.
  • Developmental abnormalities.
  • Poor tooth and root positions.
  • Problems inside a tooth or below the gum line.

Detecting and treating dental problems at an early stage may save you time, money, unnecessary discomfort, and your teeth!

Are dental x-rays safe?

We are all exposed to natural radiation in our environment.  Digital x-rays produce a significantly lower level of radiation compared to traditional dental x-rays.  Not only are digital x-rays better for the health and safety of the patient, they are faster and more comfortable to take, which reduces your time in the dental office.  Also, since the digital image is captured electronically, there is no need to develop the x-rays, thus eliminating the disposal of harmful waste and chemicals into the environment.

Even though digital x-rays produce a low level of radiation and are considered very safe, dentists still take necessary precautions to limit the patient’s exposure to radiation.  These precautions include only taking those x-rays that are necessary, and using lead apron shields to protect the body.

How often should dental x-rays be taken?

The need for dental x-rays depends on each patient’s individual dental health needs.  Your dentist and dental hygienist will recommend necessary x-rays based upon the review of your medical and dental history, a dental exam, signs and symptoms, your age, and risk of disease.

A full mouth series of dental x-rays is recommended for new patients.  A full series is usually good for three to five years.  Bite-wing x-rays (x-rays of top and bottom teeth biting together) are taken at recall (check-up) visits and are recommended once or twice a year to detect new dental problems.

 


Piezoelectric bone surgery

In surgery, there can be an advantage to having an instrument that is selective in what it can act on. Piezoelectric devices allow for cutting of hard tissue without touching soft tissue. This can limit trauma and complications. It has uses for extraction of teeth, flap surgery, and sinus augmentations or lifts. This technology can help avoid the need for stitches in some procedures and decrease the invasiveness of some surgical procedures.


 VATECH 3D Imaging

We are proud to announce that we are utilizing the advanced PaX-Duo3D imaging system.  This offers the most efficient 2-in-1 solution by providing high-quality Panoramic & 3D images.  To learn more about this system, we encourage you to visit http://www.vatechamerica.com/products/cbct/pax-duo3d.php